New Invaders

The most cost effective and environmentally friendly way to control invasive weed species is to prevent them from gaining a foot-hold on the land. That is why the Land Operations/Range program focuses much time and effort on preventing new weeds from spreading. It is far less expensive to treat a small patch of weeds, before it becomes larger and harder and/or impossible to control. 

"New Invader" species that are of the most interest for weed control activities to the Land Operations/Range Program, please see the following for a list of these priority weed species.

  • flowering rush
  • common bugloss
  • hawkweed, yellow
  • hawkweed, orange
  • hoary alyssum
  • Japanese knotweed
  • purple loosestrife
  • thistle, plumeless
  • thistle, Scotch
  • scentless mayweed
  • oxeye daisy
  • spurge, myrtle
  • spurge, leafy 
  • wild parsnip
  • spurge flax
  • yellow toadflax
  • yellow star thistle 
 Land Operations through a grant with WSU extension, provided signage to highlight some new invader species to be on the look out for across the Reservation. Signs were installed in public areas such as campgrounds, meeting areas and boat launches.

Land Operations through a grant with WSU extension, provided signage to highlight some new invader species to be on the look out for across the Reservation. Signs were installed in public areas such as campgrounds, meeting areas and boat launches.